Add Value to Your Prospects

Add Value to Your Prospects


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November 17th, 2009



Add Value to Your Prospects

by Noel Wiggins





Got a friendly feedback from a friend I met on twitter topday.


Check him out at http://twitter.com/LinkedInKing or

http://deanholmes.me/


After we exchanged our tweeting greetings he mentioned that my site was nice but looked like I was out to get a mailing list instead of building relationships.


I had to admit this was great feedback and peeked my interest on learning more.


After we discussed a while we came to the conclusion that having contact info, is more important than me trying to “capture” visitor’s information. He pointed out that it would be better to give a a white paper of sorts that would be of value to a prospect in exchange for them submitting their info. And while I believe the blog I maintain will be that actual value, I would like to create some sort of free gift for folks to “entice” them to reach out to nopun.


But I began to question what would be of “value” to the general visitor. I came across these 15 tips and thought these would be great to think about while reviewing my contact list. Seeing if I can’t help out my existing clients, there are some good ideas here and can’t wait to try and add “value” to my prospect and client list.


1. Forward relevant articles. Forwarding one or two articles or links is all that you should do here unless you get feedback asking for more of them. Don’t annoy someone by sending tons of stuff forever. One or two well chosen articles should do nicely. Audio and video clips are included in this.

2. Mention the person in a blog post or article you are writing. It is a good idea to run it by the person first although not always necessary if you are mentioning something that is already in the public domain. A positive brief mention will likely go over nicely.

3. Give them a marketing tip they can use for their business. It should be specific to something they do. Maybe you noticed something on the website or see someplace where some brief feedback could be helpful.

4. Write a helpful article for a publication or blog. Maybe you are in a position to feature the person in a publication or blog you regularly write for. Rather than just a brief mention as per item 2 above, this would be more of a feature that might involve you interviewing the person for your piece. Including the person in a speech you are giving also fits in here.

5. Introduce them to a prospective alliance partner. This can be a prospective client or someone the person can work with in some capacity. This is a common and traditional way to help someone.

6. Give them a relevant book. Don’t badger someone into reading it or become offended if it ends up sitting on a credenza for several months unread. It is also a good idea to let them pass it on to someone else who might find it more interesting. Don’t confuse this with loaning someone a book where there is an expectation of getting it back. That can become embarrassing if the book is lost, damaged or forgotten.

7. Forward them a useful template. This works especially well if you are well organized and have a collection of useful templates. Examples include business planning, GTD tools, checklists, marketing resources, etc.

8. Recommend directories where they can promote their business online.There is a large and growing number of places where people can promote their business online. Check and see if there is already a listing on one or more of the places that you look for stuff at. If there is no listing, suggest it.

9. Give them a testimonial. If suitable, you could give them something for their website, book, etc. The converse also works in some circumstances. This is where you put their blurb on your site, book, etc.

10. Sponsor or volunteer for their organization or group. This is a great way of supporting the person without being too direct about it. You can easily vary the level of support depending on your interests.

11. Give them promotional products. Most people like getting free stuff so if you give them a sample promotional product, it should go over well. Be careful to ensure you don’t violate their gift protocol if they work for the government or some other organization that has restrictions or disclosure requirements.

12. Answer their questions on LinkedIn or Yahoo Answers. Being able to answer someone’s question in a timely manner definitely adds value.

13. Forward their article to a colleague or client (and let them know).Spreading his or her information around is often an easy and effective way to help someone while also giving value to the recipient. Using the shot gun approach of blasting the information to your mailing lists is almost never a very good idea. But picking and choosing one or more select people to send it to can add good value.

14. Invite them to a relevant business event (just invite or pay for them).Some might consider a hockey or football game a relevant business event. In any case, sending invitations or tickets should be done based on his or her preferences and interests. Check schedules and availabilities before sending stuff out. Also make it easy for the person to politely decline your offer in case it doesn’t fit.

15. Buy their product or help make a sale. If the fit is a good one, buy it. Or if there is a clear fit for someone you know, help close the sale.

Doing these quick and simple things for someone adds value and can go a long way toward making a lasting positive impression. These things also tend to separate the doers from the talkers in the eyes of the recipient.

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This entry was posted on Tuesday, November 17th, 2009 at 10:35 pm and is filed under Starting A Design Business. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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About The Author



Noel Wiggins


Building and leading high performing marketing campaign that deliver results on time and within budget is both my area of expertise and my passion. For over 10 years I have developed integrated marketing strategies for online offline and all points in between. CEO’s and Marketing Managers both have recognized me for my ability to effectively shape my creative solutions to fit the needs of their demographics dramatically improving the effectiveness of their entire marketing efforts.



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